Are we instilling a princess persona too early and too often in girls?

In today’s day and age we have alot going on in our culture. One of the most mind blowing is the age that adolescent girls are beginning to wear make up. The subject outrages me, because it seems that every year the girls are getting younger when they begin to layer themselves with makeup. In my women’s colloquium class we have seen videos of 9 year old girls applying make up and doing their hair, taking up to an hour to get ready to go the mall after school.  Then there are places like this http://www.thelampnyc.org/2012/02/07/building-a-culture-of-princess-ified-beauty-one-glitter-manipedi-at-a-time/?utm_source=February+2012+Newsletter&utm_campaign=February+2012+Newsletter&utm_medium=email. They are salons that are catered specifically to girls 7 and up where they can get mani/peddis, facials, up-dos, and a face full of make up applied giving them a princess make over, and instilling the idea that girls must wear make up, dress pretty, and strut for attention at an terribly young age! I believe there is a time and a place for “dress up” but parents should be telling their children about the age appropriateness and how they should always love themselves for who they are. I myself consider my looks to be a thing of confidence and lucky in the gene pool. I did not start wearing makeup until I was 15.5 and even then it was only eyeliner, up until today, all I wear on a regular basis is eyeliner and when I go out it, I only add mascara and eye shadow. I’m now a 21 year old girl, and have a fine perspective on myself and beauty. I do not feel the need of going out all dressed up everyday. Once a week you can find me with no make up on and in sweat pants.

What truly irritates me is that my 11 year old cousin, who looks strikingly similar to me, with good skin and hair, is wearing make up and dying the hell out of her hair. I had not started highlighting my hair until I was 16 or 17. And she doesn’t even look like (she is now 13) her own age! I am friends with her on facebook and I have my college age friends gasping at what she looks like with her actual age. This scares the shit out of me. I am so afraid she is going to lose her innocence (and yes I am referring to first sexual experiences here) at way to young of an age, that she wouldn’t know what it means or how important that other person and her own self respect should be to her. When these 13 year old girls dress, and look as though they are legal (18) there is a definite problem with the culture and world. I say dress your own age, look your own age. I know there is a crazy amount of hormones screaming through their bodies, a surge that can be confusing, but that doesn’t mean you should be acting on them. They should wait to wear these specific clothing and make up until their conscience and minds are more developed. Just because the plumbing is there doesn’t mean you have to use it. I know most girls hit puberty around 13 and boys balls don’t really drop until 14/15, but they are in no state of maturity to be presenting themselves in a manner of self provocation  and willingness to perform sexual acts. Which is happening at younger and younger ages now. Girls are getting pregnant at the age of 15, they hardly even know whats what down there because the school and gov’t system is so jacked up the sexual education is only pleasing the church.

 

Im getting way off topic and my heart rate is rising. So I will end on this. Girls need to know they need to beloved for the outside and inside, and should not be wearing makeup until a later age, at least high school. Which is the age 14. But really even then you don’t need that much.

 

And then there is bull shit like this out there http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qk7-DFl2o1w&ob=av3e, and parents who apparently don’t know about what the fuck there kids are doing in there room. IDIOTS.

 

 

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2 comments on “Are we instilling a princess persona too early and too often in girls?

  1. I agree that girls (and they are girls at age 13–not young women yet) are being sexualized by the culture because it trains them up in the way culture wants them to go–sexy consumers who are insecure in their looks (and buy lots of beauty products) and in their sense of “self,” making them easy prey for marketers and some men. What time are they wasting that could be better spent on developing a full and competent sense of self?

  2. It is crazy to think that my single blog, this blog, caused an up rise in my family. Apparently my sister-in-law thought that it would be a good idea to tell said cousin that I spoke about, about this post. No one sided with me then! It was ridiculous. Not even my own mother thought I was thinking clearly. She told me how all of my friends was wearing make-up back at that age too. She even pulled out photo albums. No one in my family seemed to understand why this was such a problem and I was the black sheep. My mother and friends accused me of not understanding because I have such nice skin. It was so frustrating that they wouldn’t even listen to reason! I definitely think that these girls should be spending their time doing things that better their mind not their face.

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