Doctor Who (What did Jacki K Watch? Day 21)

10 Years ago New Who Premiered! Thank you every day Chris and Billie! You changed my life.

Reel Thoughts of Jacki K, Jacki Krumnow, Jacqueline Krumnow

Ninth and Rose Ninth and Rose

Wow, so, it’s been longer than a week since I have written a blog, but I swear it’s for good reason. I went on that camping trip, then to Cedar Point, and began a new job. SO it’s been a busy week and a half. I haven’t really watched anything new lately, but I did rewatch the first series of Doctor Who to get my younger cousin introduced to the fandom. So today’s post will be about beginning the fanatical, phonomenal Doctor Who franchise again.

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Wolf Creek 2

wolf creekSo last night my remote decided I wanted to watch 2013’s Wolf Creek 2. I was like:

Sure why not,  it may or may not be torture porn but like, it has 2 stars,  I’ve watched horror movies with a lower recommendation than that.

Now I’ll admit,  I’m not the biggest fan of the torture porn genre of horror.  It’s by far the lowest point of the genres,  but it takes a lot of balls and creativity to come up with some of the ways the killer massacres their victims. That is one point I’ll always give ’em. I also have not watched the original Wolf Creek from shit, was it 2005? I’m writing this on the mobile app,  tough to check that shit. Continue reading

Grabbers (2012)

grabbersGrabbers is a creature film that takes place in an island off the coast of Ireland and focuses around the whole town getting shit-faced to survive. Happy St. Patrick’s Day everyone.

To celebrate, I tried finding the most Irish movie on Netflix to watch (aside from the Leprechaun, because fuck that shit). With the help of Kris Holt, I decided on Jon Wright‘s Grabbers. The beginning of the film shows a bright, burning light falling down to the ocean surrounding the wee town. So it’s bit of a cross between creature and alien film but without the scares.  Continue reading

Nightmare On Elm Street 1984 vs. 2010

2014’s 13 Days of Horror: Days 05 and 06 of BoOctober

1984 Original vs. 2010 Remake

The Nightmare on Elm Street franchise has the gory privilege of being the most fun horror series out of the top slasher films. Not only are they fun, but they are also capable of delivering some real scares (in the earlier years). None of this would be possible without Freddy, the man of your dreams. Well… I suppose the man of horror fan’s dreams and the nightmares of a person that doesn’t devour each and every installment once every few years. We Fred Heads have a bit of a problem. The same problem that we Crystal Campers and Babysitters all have. We watch, we rewatch, we make our friends watch, all to the point that most people wouldn’t find the films interesting or entertaining any more, but we scoff at those sane people. For we know a real good time, and we find others like us. Others who know that there is only one Fred Kruger, and that Kruger will be the focus point of number 1 of the  10 comparisons and contrasts of A Nightmare on Elm Street.  Continue reading

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 1974 vs. 2003

2014’s 13 Days of Horror: Days 03 and 04 of BoOctober

1974 Original vs. 2003 Remake

Tobe Hooper scared the pants off of me when I was little. I was a bit young to be watching The Poltergeist before puberty, but alas, that was my up-bringing. Let’s keep in mind that the movie about the house filled with spooky sectors was actually rated PG though, because God knows what the hell the MPAA was thinking. A few years before we got suburbia built on top of a graveyard, we had Hooper direct and write the “supposedly” true story of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Which is an odd title for the 1974 film that started off the slasher genre and ushered in the horror tropes we now know and love. A.) Because the story it is supposedly based on actually took place in Wisconsin and B.) not only did the real “Leatherface” not have the weapon of choice be a chainsaw, but our original film hardly uses a chainsaw! Anyways, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre is in my personal bottom slot of the slasher genre’s top four killers: Jason Vorhees, Michael Myers, Leatherface, and Freddy Krueger. The films have never really resonated at all with me, and the lack of enthusiasm that you read below is why. So sorry about my 10 comparisons and contrasts being short, and a bit lack-luster. But Hey! Day 05 and 06 will be on the Nightmare franchise, and I fucking love Freddy.  Continue reading

Halloween 1978 vs 2007

2014’s 13 Days of Horror: Days 01 and 02 of BoOctober

 1978 Original vs. 2007 Remake

Some say that Michael Myers was the leader in slasher films. He began what was to be known as the golden age… um excuse me, the bloody age of slasher that would blossom in the 80s become a joke in the 90s and a satirical ploy by the time the new century was rolling in. But if we look chronologically, we see that Leatherface actually began this age of slash, back in 1974, but we’ll focus on that franchise tomorrow. Today we will talk about the influential silent killer, the boy that turned into PURE EVIL and made the night of Halloween frightening for adults and horny teenagers, not just little tykes afraid of the boogeyman in their closet. Below are 10 comparisons and contrasts of John Carpenter’s indie film Halloween and Rob Zombie’s high-budgeted Halloween. And you will come to see that more money, doesn’t always mean the audience will get a better movie. Continue reading

Pulp Fiction, 20 years later

Poster of Pulp Fiction 

20 Reasons why Pulp Fiction still Rocks 20 years later

1 & 2.) Pumpkin and Honey Bunny- two madly in love sociopaths looking to make a buck and get their rocks off. Only months after the world is introduced to Micky and Mallory Knox from Natural Born Killers we get two minor characters that set the chaotic tone of the entire Anachronic film.

3.) The Soundtrack – Not only is Quentin Tarantino known for his non-chronological director technique, but also his massive hard on for classic songs the majority of the population hasn’t thought about in years. Continue reading

Mud (2013) (Day 21 of 100)

Mud__2013__HD_230x322_poMud (2012) is a coming of age story starring Matthew McConaughey as a hobo? There was a specific word along the lines of hobo, tramp, or bum that title character Mud did not like to be called, I think it was “bum.” But Mud wasn’t a real bum, he was just camping out in a boat in a tree hiding from the group of people that wanted to kill him because he killed one of them. The plot sounds awfully silly for a coming of age story, but the real plot is driven by a young 14 year old country boy, Ellis(Tye Sheridan), whose trust in Mud is concerning, to the point where his buddy Neckbone (Jacob Lofland) even realizes it. 

The movie in lengthy for a coming of age film, whopping in at a total of 130 minutes, but delivers its’ central theme with a balance of grace and unforgiving bluntness. What writer and director Jeff Nichols really wants the audience to come away with, is how toxic and repetitively abusive a dysfunctional relationship can be for a man wrapped up in the entanglements of a woman with loads of baggage and a tendency to date around. He spins this beautiful web of deception making us, and the young boy Ellis, believe that Mud and his on-again-off-again girlfriend  Juniper (Reese Witherspoon) are meant to be with each other because their each others “true loves” and they should be together, gosh darn it! But this is a coming of age movie, not a romance movie, and as Ellis looks up to Mud more and more each day, we slowly begin to see that the relationship is noxious and harmful to Mud. That his life would be so much better if he never fell in love with her when he was Ellis’ age (who happens to fall for an older girl who only give him attention when her friends are gone), and he would have had a better chance at being happy and accomplishing something with his life. 

The end of the film is bittersweet. Mud finally realizes that he needs to move on and begin his life anew, but when Ellis is forced to move to town with his mother after his parent’s divorce, he looks longingly at another older girl that lives in the complex; showing that he’s moved on from the last girl, but still longs for something that is unattainable, just like Mud and his multiple decade long affair with a dangerous woman.

Does Mud need to be watched by everyone? No, maybe just the men out there who think they can never be single. Does the film deserve to be on the top 100 critically praised list? Not really, but it would be your choice to watch the film after this review, now wouldn’t it?

The Graduate (Day 11 of 100)

Poster

Skipping around a bit here, and writing reviews for film’s I have already seen, since I have fallen so far behind in my 100ish Days of Summer. Number 90 on my list is the 1967 coming of age film The Graduate starring Dustin Hoffman, who, the lucky dog, has already appeared on this list two other times, once for All The President’s Men and another time for Rain Mann, and I am sure he will be appearing again later.

I watched The Graduate for the first time at what might have been the perfect age to see the film, I believe I was a Junior in college and well on my way of not knowing what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. A seemingly silly, but difficult impasse that every college student faces, the same as Dustin Hoffman‘s character Ben Braddock, a recent college graduate, home for the summer. Bored and complacent, and lacking a sense of direction, Ben begins to “accidentally” have an affair with his soon to be girlfriend’s mother, the elusive Mrs. Robinson (notice the “Mrs.” she is married at this time). Although the film has no real driving plot and the characters themselves seem listless and underwritten, the film has been selected for preservation because of its “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significance.”  Some people may believe that this film should be watched by everyone at least once, but at the age of this twenty-something-year old, it is a bit lost on me. Maybe with more age, I would appreciate why this film is considered one of the greats, but as a product of the 90s and the new millennium, the time, acting, and writing, is mostly lost on me. 

It was by no means enjoyable to watch, but I appreciated what the 106 minute film set out to do and why it is considered great, but the only the thing I really took away from The Graduate was the amazing Simon and Garfunkle song that is still popular today, and that ending scene. I suppose, that currently, in my eyes, Dustin Hoffman is 1 for 3 in films on the top 100 list and whether the films deserves the spot.