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New To Netflix February 2020: Horror, Mystery, & Thriller Content

There’s a bunch of new content that dropped in January and February, so today, we review what is the worst to the best for Horror, Mystery, and Thriller content. A new grading scale is presented in this video, let me know what you think of it instead of a top 5 list!

There are a total of 8 films, so stick around and find out what is the best to watch on the streaming giant and what to avoid. We examine old thrillers like Raising Cain and What Lies Beneath, classic horror gems like Evil Dead and Tremors while looking at the new mysterious content like Horse Girl and the Girl on the Third Floor while keeping you far away from horror shite like a Nightmare on Elm Street remake and Polaroid.

We tried a new editing tactic too, love to hear feedback. Was there something else that dropped in these categories in January and February that we should have discussed? Drop a comment below and tell us how we screwed up!

Phantoms (1998)

Phantoms Poster

Phantoms Poster

Phantoms is a horror, sci-fi, thriller set in a ski town of Colorado that is very much dated by the decade of the 90’s; if not by just the cast but the special effects alone. The movie is based off of a novel by horror writer Dean Koontz who also happened to pen the screenplay. The movie is a bit of a cross-over between The Thing (1982) and Scream (1996); it’s pretty much a small group of 90’s arch-type characters being picked-off one by one by creatures from another world that they can’t really identify. It even casts Rose McGowan as the classic whore, a Skeet Ulrich look-a-like Ben Affleck, and a young Liev Schreiber; so as you can tell, they are trying hella hard to replicate the success of Craven’s Scream. 

Overall the film is lack-luster with time. It did not age well in the last 17 years; the scares are dismissive, the creature are un-realistic and poorly construed, the cast only called in on half the days, and the story holds no real sense of believable urgency. It’s a bummer as my boyfriend highly recommended the film as a fun, campy 90’s classic; for me it missed the mark, which is disappointing as I am a very big fan of Koontz’ Odd Thomas which is also on Netflix as of May, 2015.

Bates Motel is Creatively New, Yet Respectful to the Original

Last night, March 18 at 10:00 p.m., A&E premiered Bates Motel, what seems to be a modern day take on the teenage years of Norman Bates which is splendidly nerve-wracking and intensely  spine-tingling.

Going into the pilot episode I was expecting it to take place during the same time era as the movie, which may have been the 1960s? (I have scoured the internet and can not seem to find the answer, so if you know the time period of Psycho tell me in the comments!)

It’s not until I see Norman with an iPhone that I realize, OH! It takes place today! I would have never realized this because the first 5 minutes of the show is very nineteen-sixtiesish. The car that Norman and his mother own seems nearly identical to the iconic car in the original film. Continue reading